The MongoDB Java Driver 3.0: What’s Changing

Aug 30 • Posted 1 year ago

By Trisha Gee, MongoDB Java Engineer and Evangelist

In the last post, we covered the design goals for the new MongoDB Java Driver. In this one, we’re going to go into a bit more detail on the changes you can expect to see, and how to start playing with an alpha version of the driver. Please note, however, that the driver is still a work in progress, and not ready for production.

New features

Other than the overall changes to design detailed above, the 3.0 driver has the following new features:

  • Pluggable Codecs: This means you can do simple changes to serialisation/deserialisation, like tell the driver to use Joda Time instead of java.util.Date, or you can take almost complete control of how to turn your Java objects into BSON. This should be particularly useful for ODMs or other libraries, as they can write their own codecs to convert Java objects to BSON bytes.
  • Predictable cluster management: We’ve done quite a lot of work around discovering the servers in your cluster and determining which ones to talk to. In particular, the driver doesn’t have to wait for all servers to become available before it can start using the ones that are definitely there - the design is event-based so as soon as a server notifies the driver of its state the driver can take appropriate action - use it if it’s active, or start ignoring it if it’s no longer available.
  • Additional Connection Pool features: We’ve added support for additional connection pool settings, and a number of other improvements around connection management. Here’s the full list.
  • Deprecated methods/classes will be removed: In the next 2.x release a number of methods and classes will be deprecated. These, along with existing deprecated methods, will be removed in the 3.0 driver. This should point you in the right direction to help you migrate from 2.x to 3.x.

Speaking of Migration…

We’ve worked hard to maintain backwards compatibility whilst moving forwards with the architecture of the Java driver for MongoDB. We want to make migration as painless as possible, in many cases it should be a simple drop-in replacement if you want to keep using the existing API. We hope to provide a step-by-step guide to migrating from 2.x to 3.0 in the very near future. For now, it’s worth mentioning that upgrading will be easiest if you update to 2.12 (to be released soon), migrate any code that uses deprecated features, and then move to the compatible mode of the new driver.

Awesome! Can I try it?

Yes you can! You can try out an alpha of the new driver right now, but as you’d expect there are CAVEATS: this is an alpha, it does not support all current features (notably aggregation); although it has been tested it is still in development and we can’t guarantee everything will work as you expect. Features which have been or will be deprecated in the 2.x driver are missing completely from the 3.0 driver. Please don’t use it in production. However, if you do want to play with it in a development environment, or want to run your existing test suite against it, please do send us any feedback you have.

If you want to use the compatible mode, with the old API (minus deprecations) and new architecture:

Maven

Gradle

You should be able to do a drop-in replacement with this dependency - use this instead of your existing MongoDB driver, run it in your test environment and see how ready you are to use the new driver.

If you want to play with the new, ever-changing, not-at-all-final API, then you can use the new driver with the new API. Because we wanted to be able to support both APIs and not have a big-bang switchover, there’s a subtle difference to the location of the driver with the updated API, see if you can spot it:

Maven

Gradle

Note that if you use the new API version, you don’t have access to the old compatible API.

Of course, the code is in GitHub

In Summary

For 3.0, we will deliver the updated, simplified architecture with the same API as the existing driver, as well as working towards a more fluent style of API. This means that although in future you have the option of using the new API, you should also be able to do a simple drop-in replacement of your driver jar file and have the application work as before.

A release date for the 3.0 driver has not been finalized, but keep your eyes open for it.

All Hail the new Java driver!

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