Posts tagged:

ecommerce

How MongoDB makes custom e-commerce easy

Sep 17 • Posted 2 years ago

The market for open source e-commerce software has gone through a lot of stages already, as you might know it by popular platforms like osCommerce, Magento, Zen Cart, PrestaShop, Spree, just to name a few. These platforms are frequently used as a basis for custom e-commerce apps, and they all require a SQL database. Given the inherent challenge in adapting open source software to custom features, it would seem that MongoDB is poised to play an important role in the next wave of e-commerce innovation.

Kyle Banker was one of the first to blog about MongoDB and e-commerce in April 2010, and there’s been surprisingly little written about it since then. In his blog, Kyle writes about Magento and other SQL based platforms: “What you’ll see is a flurry of tables working together to provide a flexible schema on top of a fundamentally inflexible style of database system.”

To this we must ask, why is a flexible schema so important in e-commerce?

Open source platforms are meant to be adapted to many different designs, conversion flows, and business processes. A flexible schema helps by giving developers a way to relate custom data structures to the platform’s existing model. Without a flexible schema, the developer has to get over high hurdles to make a particular feature possible. When the cost of creating and maintaining a custom feature is too high, the options are: give up the feature, start over with a different platform, or build a platform from scratch. That’s an expensive proposition.

There is a better way

For the past year we’ve been developing Forward, a new open source e-commerce platform combined with MongoDB. It’s been in production use since March 2012, and finally reached a point where we can demonstrate the benefits that MongoDB’s schema-less design brings to custom feature development.

The following examples demonstrate Forward’s REST-like ORM conventions, which are only available in the platform itself, but the underlying concepts map directly to MongoDB’s document structure. In this case, think of get() as db.collection.find() — put() as insert/update() — post() as insert() — and delete() as… delete().

Prototype faster

The majority of e-commerce sites represent small businesses, where moving fast can be the most important aspect of a web platform. When the flexible document structure of MongoDB is carried through the platform’s model interface, adding custom fields becomes easier than ever.

For example, let’s say you need a simple administrative view for adding a couple custom attributes to a product. Here’s a basic example for that purpose, written in Forward’s template syntax:

{args $product_id}

{if $request.post}
    {$product = put("/products/$product_id", [
        spec => $params.spec,
        usage => $params.usage
    ])}
    {flash notice="Saved" refresh=true}
{else}
    {$product = get("/products/$product_id")}
{/if}

<for method="post">
    <div class="field">
        <label>Product specification</label>
        <textarea name="spec">{$product.spec|escape}</textarea>
    </div>
    <div class="field">
        <label>Product usage instructions</label>
        <textarea name="usage">{$product.usage|escape}</textarea>
    </div>
    <button type="submit">Save product</button>
</form>

It might be obvious what this template does, but what might be less obvious is that the platform knows nothing about the “spec” or “usage” fields, and yet they are treated as if the e-commerce data model was designed for them. No database migration necessary, just code.

You may argue this can be accomplished with a fuzzy SQL database structure, and you would be correct, but it’s not pretty, or readable with standard database tools. Ad-hoc queries on custom fields would become difficult.

Query on custom fields

If all we needed were custom key/value storage, you might not benefit that much from of a flexible schema. Where MongoDB really shines is in its ability to query on any document field, even embedded documents.

{get $oversized_products from "/products" [
    oversized => true,
    active => true
]}

There are {$oversized_products.count} active oversized products

These fields may or may not be known by the e-commerce API, but in this case MongoDB’s query syntax finds only the documents with matching fields.

No more relational complexity

For those who spent years writing relational SQL queries, this is a big change. How do we create data relationships without joins? There are many different strategies, but Forward defines a field as either a static value or a callback method. This allows a field to return another document or collection based on a query. The result is a data model that can walk through relationships without joins. For example (PHP):

// class Accounts extends AppModel
...
$this->fields => array(
    ...
    'orders' => function ($order) {
        return get("/orders", array('account_id' => $account['id']));
    }
);

This relationship can be used in a template like this:

{get $account from "/accounts/$session.account_id"}

You’ve placed

<table>
    {foreach $account.orders as $order}
        <tr>
            <td>#{$order.id}</td>
            <td>${$order.sub_total}</td>
            <td>${$order.grand_total}</td>
            <td>{$order.items|count} item(s)</td>
        </tr>
    {/foreach}
</table>

Relationships can be defined by simple or complex queries. Results are lazy-loaded, making this example possible:

{get $order from "/orders/123"}

{$order.account.name} placed {$order.account.orders.count} orders since {$order.account.orders.first.date_created|date_format}

// Output: John Smith placed 3 orders since Jun 14, 2012

What about transactions?

Many people bring up MongoDB’s lack of atomic transactions across collections as evidence that it’s not suitable for e-commerce applications. This has not been a significant barrier in our experience so far.

There are other ways to approach data integrity. In systems with low-moderate data contention, optimistic locking is sufficient. We’ll share more details about these strategies as things progress.

In conclusion

The future of e-commerce software looks bright with MongoDB. It’s time to blaze new trails where convoluted schemas, complex relational queries, and hair raising database migrations are a thing of the past. If you’re interested in working with Forward before public release, please consider joining the private beta and help us reinvent open source e-commerce as the world knows it.

A guest post from Eric Ingram, developer/founder @getfwd

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